Diabetespeaks DiabeteSpeaks is an awareness program for Type1 diabetes told through personal experiences. Millions of stories. One community.

February 21, 2017  

Season 2, episode 10: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.

In our final episode of DiabeteSpeaks, we talk with Brittney and Bruno, who dated in high school and reconnected several years later and got married. Diagnosed at the age of 11, Brittney struggled with an eating disorder known as diabulimia, withholding insulin to lose weight. She tells us about the turning point that led to her eventual recovery, and how pregnancy and family life influenced her: “The hardest thing to deal in pregnancy was the fear and guilt that goes through you if your blood sugar spikes, which it really does toward the end of the pregnancy. Working through those emotions and trying not to think about worst-case scenarios, but I had a lot of support from family and my doctors. A lot of feelings from my past resurfaced.”

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December 19, 2016  

Season 2, episode 9: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.

Taylor’s an avid athlete who has lived with T1D since 2002. In this episode, she tells us about how her diabetes management was influenced by her lifestyle, and why connecting with other people living with type 1 diabetes is important to her: “You can hear things from your doctor or your parents telling you what to do, but to hear things from people on a peer level who are going through a similar situation, that was more helpful to me and made me feel more comfortable with what I was going through than hearing it from my parents and my doctors.”

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October 25, 2016  

Season 2, episode 8: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.

Meg’s story begins with a planned trip to Africa as part of a public health program at Johns Hopkins University. Shortly before her departure, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In this interview, Meg talks about being the third of four daughters to be diagnosed with T1D, and shares her enthusiasm for participating in clinical trials, and why she encourages others to get involved: “If you can, you should. I think it’s important to recognize we’re here today because people participated in them before us.” 

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September 13, 2016  

Season 2, episode 7: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org. 

Jewels was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 13, in 1984. In 2007, her five-year-old daughter was also diagnosed with T1D. As a nurse, Jewels shares the many perspectives of life with T1D and what she’s learned over the years—from balancing diets based on the old exchange system, changing technology over the years, to important lessons learned from her daughter. “[My daughter said] ‘You know how diabetes feels for you, but you don’t know how diabetes feel for me.’ I needed to learn how to look at diabetes through the eyes of a 5-year-old, not through my eyes, because it’s not a reflection of how it feels to you inside.”

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August 10, 2016  

Season 2, episode 6: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.

In this episode, we talk with Jessica, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 29. Because health insurance isn’t often available in the field of massage therapy, a job she’s passionate about, she’d on Medicaid. Jess talks frankly about a number of issues, from dealing with harsh judgments about her reliance on Medicaid to the impact of T1D on dating. She also talks about what has changed since being on Medicaid: “I used to have to think about getting a box of Apidra, and that’s going to be fifty bucks.  And test strips are another fifty bucks. So I’m going to have to either spend a hundred dollars at the pharmacy or I can buy groceries this week. It gets scary, you know, when you have to really choose between food and your medication that you kind of need the food to have with the medication and it’s just a gigantic terrible cycle.” 

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July 7, 2016  

Season 2, episode 5:DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1DExchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetesresearch today: visit www.myglu.org.

In our previous episode we talked with Jennifer, whose fiancée Jeff was diagnosed with type 1 at the age of 33. Today, we talk with Jeff about life with T1D—his views on the pescatarian diet and how he plans for activities like soccer and climbing. “It’s a lot of trial and error, and finding your comfort zone. Figuring out that proper basal rate just allows your boluses to be much more effective.” 

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June 1, 2016  

Season 2, episode 4: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.

We’ve heard a lot in this series from people with diabetes (PWD), but how does diabetes fit into the life of people who are with PWDs? In this episode, we talk with Jennifer, whose partner, Jeff, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 32. She shares how they adjusted their food choices, to CGM alarms, and the bigger picture in overall health and well-being. “Having others to connect with is a profoundly overlooked resource. Even if they don’t have the answers that you need, they have some bit of information. They have a piece of the puzzle. They have their own experiences.” 

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May 20, 2016  
Season 2, episode 3: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org.
In this episode of DiabeteSpeaks, podcast host Steve Richert (and avid climber) talks with Blake, a fellow climber and photographer about the life of adventuring with type 1 diabetes. Diagnosed 14 years ago, Blake talks about how learning to live with type 1 was a foundational element in pursuing an unconventional lifestyle. Learn how he plans for an excursion in the wilds of Venezuela, and what life lessons come from his journey: “It’s a really slow build-up of experience and knowledge that you use to basically mediate risk. I don’t feel like I’m rolling the dice any more than I am when I drive to the grocery store. I think there’s inherent risk in anything we do in life.” 
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May 6, 2016  

Season 2, episode 2: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: visit www.myglu.org

This is the second half of our interview with an entire family—both parents are medical professionals, and their two daughters have type 1 diabetes, and their son has Crohn’s disease. 17-year-old Maddie talks about an unexpected challenge when getting her driver’s license: “Having type 1 diabetes and driving is harder than you think. Every year that you have to get a letter signed by your doctor saying that you are taking good care of your diabetes and that you are okay to drive. So I got my letter when I first got my license and I was like, ‘Okay, I’ll just get it signed and it’ll be fine.’ I didn’t know until recently that it was going to be that way every year for the rest of my life.” 

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April 12, 2016  

Season 2, episode 1: DiabeteSpeaks is a special project of T1D Exchange and the Glu community--join us and become part of type 1 diabetes research today: vist www.myglu.org. 

Welcome to season 2 of the DiabeteSpeaks podcast! This is the first of a two-part interview with an entire family—both parents are medical professionals, and their two daughters have type 1 diabetes, and their son has Crohn’s disease.They share the many challenges they faced with a toddler with T1D, and how the family's support for each other helped them cope with the emotional aspects of life with chronic conditions. “When you get that first A1C, it feels like a report card as a parent, and you can feel like a failure. And you can’t beat yourself up for that. You just have to try your best. Every time Maddie lost a tooth, or every time she would go through a growth spurt, it would just throw her blood sugars all over the place. And trying to manage them was so difficult.You have to take it day by day.” 

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